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There All the Honor Lies

There All the Honor Lies
A Memoir

This memoir by the first permanently appointed female African American judge in Texas recalls a lifetime of activism in the civil rights movement, as well as meetings with civil rights icons W. E. B. DuBois, Martin Luther King Jr., and Thurgood Marshall.

Series: Tower Books

The Division of Diversity and Community Engagement at the University of Texas at Austin
February 2018
Active (available)
$29.95
184 pages | 6 x 9 | 30 b&w photos |
ISBN: 
978-1-4773-1574-3
Description: 

This autobiography of the first permanently appointed female African American judge in Texas, Harriet M. Murphy, is the story not only of an African American woman who grew up in the 1930s and 1940s, but of the civil rights movement. Judge Murphy began fighting injustice and inequality early in her life. Through her work with the NAACP and the Urban League, she sought social change at the local level. She recounts meetings with civil rights icons, including W. E. B. DuBois, Martin Luther King Jr., and Thurgood Marshall. Though caught up in activism, she found time to pursue her dream of becoming a lawyer. There All the Honor Lies details some of Murphy’s most notable accomplishments, including instituting a partial payment plan for constituents who were fined by the municipal court and chairing the city of Austin’s first detoxification task force. Since retiring from the bench, Murphy has run for the Austin City Council and been inducted into the National Bar Association Hall of Fame.

Author: 

HARRIET M. MURPHY
Austin, Texas

Murphy graduated from the University of Texas at Austin School of Law, in which she was the only African American student, in 1969. In 1973, she became the first African American woman appointed to a regular judgeship in Texas and served on the City of Austin Municipal Court for twenty years. She has received many honors, among them the highest award from the Austin NAACP and the first Thurgood Marshall Legal Society award bestowed by the students at the UT School of Law. Murphy serves on the board for the National Organization of Black Judges, a part of the National Bar Association.