No Quittin' Sense

[ African American Studies ]

No Quittin' Sense

By the Reverend C. C. White and Ada Morehead Holland

The life story of Rev. C. C. "Charley" White, whose one-man war on poverty and intolerance has inspired thousands of readers since the book was first published in 1969.

1969

$25.00$16.75

33% website discount price

This is a print-on-demand title. Expedited shipping is not available.

Paperback

6 x 9 | 238 pp. | 15 b&w illustrations

ISBN: 978-0-292-75508-6

This story, set in the Piney Woods country of East Texas, spans most of a century, from shortly after the close of the Civil War to the 1960's. It is the story of Charley White, who was born in the middle of those woods—in a decaying windowless log cabin a few years after his mother and father were freed from slavery. His childhood, lived in almost unbelievable poverty, was followed by financial stability achieved in middle age through years of struggle. And then, in order to obey God's will, he abandoned this secure life, and for forty years he waged a one-man war on poverty and intolerance.

Winner of the Carr P. Collins Award (best nonfiction book) of the Texas Institute of Letters, No Quittin' Sense presents the story of Rev. C. C. "Charley" White, whose life has inspired thousands of readers since the book was first published in 1969.

This edition is a digital facsimile of the 1969 edition.

". . . one of the most important [autobiographies] by a black Texan because it touches on most facets of Negro life in East Texas for three-quarters of a century. . . . The title No Quittin' Sense is well chosen to set forth the basic theme of this book, for C. C. White clearly is one 'who has endured.'"
—Alwyn Barr, Southwestern Historical Quarterly

". . . a detailed, vivid, first-person account of a way of life in which elementary extremes operated powerfully every day."
Western American Literature

"White's story embraces, besides a personal triumph, the attaining of harmonious and fair race relations without resort to violence."
Southwest Review

"This is a moving book. I feel strong temptation to say it is some kind of classic."
Texas Observer