The Garden in Winter and Other Poems

[ Additional Subjects ]

The Garden in Winter and Other Poems

By Prentiss Moore

A book of poems by a Texas writer.

1981

$19.95$13.37

33% website discount price

This is a print-on-demand title. Expedited shipping is not available.

Paperback

6 x 9 | 116 pp.

ISBN: 978-0-292-72722-9

Constellation
Romance on Reading Meng Chiao’s “Sadness of the Gorges”
On Climbing the Big Pagoda in Changan
Map
Signature
A History of Style
A Choice of Color
Message to the Pagans
Ars Antiqua
After Leopardi
Danaë
Swallow Song
Baucis and Philemon
Poem
Ode, Garrance
Monet
Debussy
Monet at Giverny
Paris
Parisian Rondel
From the Forest
Photograph by Kertesz
Photograph of Bonn at Christmas
The Snow Leopard
Atget
Spinoza
Breton Landscape
Ma Mère L’Oye
China
Hasidim
Psychopomp
Two Poems in Autumn
The Sun in Winter
Trace
The Rock Garden
Soon It Will Be
An 18th Century Motif
Divertimento
Huntress
She Has Waited
How Their Fingertips
Good Luck
The Minor Risk of the Snail
Mother of Eros
Wind
Music
The Garden in Winter
November 7
The Perfume
A Photograph of Zapata
Paideuma
The Father
La Règie du Jeu
Sainte
Sacred Love
Figura
Nothing to Terrain
Prelude
Delicatessen
Texas
Rime
The Moon
The Greek
Measure
What Is This Now
Young Master
Vermeer’s Woman Asleep
The Roman Portrait Bust
Casanova’s Mother
Ballad of the Beautiful Ladies
The Life in Art
Ousia
Evening Star
Ontology of the Wind
Erebus
Stoned
To Choose
From Tacitus
Hard Labor
Louis Zuk of sky
Psalm of Africa
Alexandrian Idyll
The Spring of Bandusia
Soracte
1717
D’Orfeo
The Coachman’s Dream
To Mallarmé
To Baudelaire
To Roland Barthes
Light of the World
Simplicitas Syntactica
Tomb Murals of the Han and T’ang
On Hearing The Musical Offering
Begin Anywhere
March 17
And Yet I Hardly Notice
Poem
A Certain World
Postscript

Prentiss Moore (1947—1998) lived in Austin, Texas.

"Prentiss Moore's poems are dimensionally different from many poems one reads nowadays: they bring together life, art, past, and present, in the quiet and persuasive voice of a poet who feels reverence for what he touches and wishes to express what he feels personally of value, without distortion. These are truly lyrics of the intelligent imagination."
—David Wevill