Simple Things Won't Save the Earth

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Simple Things Won't Save the Earth

By J. Robert Hunter

In this provocative book, J. Robert Hunter asserts that using catchy slogans and symbols to sell the public on environmental conservation is ineffective, misleading, and even dangerous.

1997

$25.00$16.75

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Paperback

6 x 9 | 217 pp.

ISBN: 978-0-292-73113-4

We drive cars with "Save the Whales" bumper stickers, buy aerosol sprays that advertise "no chlorofluorocarbons," and wear T-shirts made from organically grown cotton. All of these "earth friendly" choices and products convince us that we are "thinking globally, acting locally" and saving the planet. But are we really?

In this provocative book, J. Robert Hunter asserts that using catchy slogans and symbols to sell the public on environmental conservation is ineffective, misleading, and even dangerous. Debunking the Fifty Simple Things You Can Do to Save the Earth approach, Hunter shows that there are no simple solutions to major environmental problems such as species extinction, ozone depletion, global warming, pollution, and non-renewable resource consumption.

The use of slogans and symbols, Hunter argues, simply gives the public a false sense that "someone" is solving the environmental crisis—while it remains as serious now as when the environmental movement began. Writing in plain yet passionate prose for general readers, he here opens a national debate on what is really required to preserve the earth as a habitat for the human species.

Preface
1. A Symbol of Our Environmental Dilemma
2. The Para Rubber Tree
3. Natural to Synthetic
4. Dream the Impossible Dream?
5. Disappearing Jungles—and Forests
6. Jungle Myths and Tall Timber Tales
7. Everybody Plant a Tree
8. The Role of Diversity
9. Impossible Dream into Inevitable Nightmare
10. What to Do with a Used Tire
11. Are We Capable of Doing the Right Thing?
12. High-Tech to the Rescue?
13. Roll Out the Barrel
14. The Para Rubber Tree and Global Ecology
15. “Man’s Inhumanity to Man”
Epilogue
Notes
Index

For more than forty-five years, the late J. Robert Hunter was a tropical environmentalist, working on a wide range of crops, forests, and land use practices. He held a Ph.D. in agronomy from Michigan State University.